Car insurance involves a lot of decision-making. You have to determine what types of coverage you actually need, find a reputable insurance company, and then hope they can offer you a rate that fits your budget. So many factors to consider.

But drivers in Florida have a new way to find cheaper auto insurance. After creating a free Squeeze account, take a few minutes to fill in your driver and auto information. Then you get real insurance quotes from real agents. Squeeze customers are saving, on average, $748 a year.

You know what I could do with an extra $748 a year? I could buy 277 tacos from Chipotle, that’s what.  

Why auto insurance is so expensive in Florida

Year after year, Florida ranks as one of the most expensive states for car insurance. The average premium is $2,219 placing it third in the nation for high car insurance, according to Insure.com’s latest data. Michigan and Louisiana are the only states where premiums are higher.

Florida is also one of the most populous states and has a huge number of licensed drivers on the road. And many of these drivers fall into the high-risk category: teenagers, seniors, tourists. 

Another reason Florida drivers are feeling the pain of auto insurance is a high rate of almost 27% uninsured drivers. This is also a no-fault state; no-fault insurance, or PIP, is a type of auto insurance that covers your own or any of your passengers’ medical expenses resulting from an accident, no matter which driver is at fault. 

If you drive a vehicle in Florida, auto insurance is a must-have. The Sunshine State minimum insurance requirements are:

  • $10,000 property damage liability

  • $10,000 personal injury protection (PIP)

  • $10,000 bodily injury per person, per accident

  • $20,000 bodily injury for all persons, per accident

Other reasons for rising car insurance costs in Florida (and throughout the country) include rising repair costs and an increase in distracted driving

driving in florida-statistics

Squeeze delivers real quotes

There are several insurance quote comparison sites out there. Unfortunately, many of them are just lead generating sites that are selling your information to brokers and agents who then bombard you with sales calls.

Squeeze is an independent agency that serves Florida drivers by providing real quotes from national, trusted auto insurance carriers. The agents work for their customers.

What’s more, once you sign up, Squeeze automatically shops your auto insurance each time your policy is up for renewal. In other words, you never have to bother with shopping for auto insurance again. Ever.

Tips to get the lowest car insurance

Review your coverage. Once you have a few auto insurance quotes to compare, be sure to review each one carefully. Each insurer may offer you slightly different coverage. If you haven’t reviewed your auto insurance policy in awhile, you might be paying for coverage you don’t need. 

For instance, if you took out an auto loan, the lender most likely required collision and comprehensive insurance coverage. If your car is now paid off, it may not be cost-effective to keep paying the highest limit amounts.  

Ask for discounts. If there have been any changes in your life recently, let your insurer know. Have you changed careers lately? Started carpooling? Maybe you are going back to school. Your insurer isn’t going to know to apply a discount for being married or belonging to a certain bank unless you let them know.

Maintain good credit. Having a good credit score can lead to getting lower auto insurance rates. Paying off a student loan or other large debt could have caused your score to jump. Head to a site like TransUnion or Credit.com to get your credit report and credit score. If you have any outstanding issues, resolve them right away.

Switch insurance. How long have you been with your current auto insurer? According to an Auto Insurance Survey from Consumer Reports, 54% of the respondents said they’ve been with their current insurer for 15+ years. Sure, your insurer may give you a discount for being a long-time customer, but I bet you it’s not enough to offset how much their rates have increased over the time you’ve been with them.